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goofienewfie


Ariens 1130DLE

Joined: Oct 25, 2007
Points: 107

Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Original Message   Nov 29, 2008 4:25 pm
Hi all;

After hearing that the Yamaha were great machines, I was doing a little reading and looking at the machines they still make in japan. Wow, these machines look like tanks. With all the details being written in japanese I have no idea what its capable of, but from the images it sure looks hardcore. I have linked to some of the images for what looks to be their top model. You can see more here http://www.yamaha-motor.jp/snowthrower/lineup/index.html



Its nice that they even included a over on top of the engine so that I can cook supper while I am blowing snow.. lol.. Just joking, not sure what this is on top of the engine. Certainly a cool rig to look at.

Cheers
Goofie Newfie
Replies: 13 - 22 of 22Next page of topicsPreviousAllView as Outline
borat


Joined: Nov 10, 2007
Points: 2692

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #13   Jan 3, 2009 10:00 pm
Teflon won't hold up too long against end of driveway snow, salt & gravel.  That's why I put the liner in.  It's very resilient and nothing sticks to it.
aa335


Joined: Nov 29, 2008
Points: 2434

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #14   Jan 3, 2009 10:07 pm
borat wrote:
Teflon won't hold up too long against end of driveway snow, salt & gravel.  That's why I put the liner in.  It's very resilient and nothing sticks to it.

What's the material of the Krazy Karpet?  Is it delrin in sheet form?  Is this similiar to the self healing cut mats?
This message was modified Jan 3, 2009 by aa335
borat


Joined: Nov 10, 2007
Points: 2692

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #15   Jan 3, 2009 10:39 pm
aa335 wrote:
What's the material of the Krazy Karpet?  Is it delrin in sheet form?  Is this similiar to the self healing cut mats?


Can't tell you what it's made of for sure.  Some kind of durable plastic, 1 mm. thick, real slick on one side textured on the other.  It's flexible but not pliable.  Takes a bit of work to form it but stays in place nicely once in.  Kids use them to slide down the hills in winter.     
aa335


Joined: Nov 29, 2008
Points: 2434

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #16   Jan 3, 2009 10:43 pm
borat wrote:
Can't tell you what it's made of for sure.  Some kind of durable plastic, 1 mm. thick, real slick on one side textured on the other.  It's flexible but not pliable.  Takes a bit of work to form it but stays in place nicely once in.  Kids use them to slide down the hills in winter.     

I'm thinking about putting this on the chute.  I have a concern about putting holes on the chute to fasten the Krazy Karpet with rivets or screws as this would expose the metal and creates rust. 

What method did you use to make me material conform to the chute?

borat


Joined: Nov 10, 2007
Points: 2692

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #17   Jan 4, 2009 9:52 am
aa335 wrote:
I'm thinking about putting this on the chute.  I have a concern about putting holes on the chute to fasten the Krazy Karpet with rivets or screws as this would expose the metal and creates rust. 

What method did you use to make me material conform to the chute?


I used two existing holes that were at the bottom of the chute and the hole that mounts to bolt to control the arc of the deflector at the top.  No drilling required with mine.  I wouldn't be nearly as worried about a couple of small holes vs. all the paint being blasted off the inside of the chute.  Neither situation would likely cause perforation or complete failure of the chute in a normal life time.  However, if you're concerned with drilling holes, paint them when you're finished drilling or put a dab of silicone on the hole when you do the assembly.  I certainly wouldn't let a couple of holes keep me from putting a liner in. 
Dr_Woof


Don't blow into the wind, and don't eat yellow snow. WOOF!

Location: Saskatchewan
Joined: Dec 13, 2010
Points: 253

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #18   Dec 29, 2010 5:59 pm
Anyone know if the gearcase (in the auger housing) is made of cast iron, or aluminum?  Seems like all the cheaper models are using aliminum but the more expensive ones are cast iron that stands up to shock better.  Also, anyone use one of these babies on hard snow?  I just bought, and returned, a nice looking 1330SE that had the snowhog tires, but it jusy did not have the trAction to get it into hard snow like my old 826 (smooth tire, but with chains) does.

borat


Joined: Nov 10, 2007
Points: 2692

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #19   Dec 29, 2010 6:39 pm
Dr_Woof wrote:
Anyone know if the gearcase (in the auger housing) is made of cast iron, or aluminum?  Seems like all the cheaper models are using aliminum but the more expensive ones are cast iron that stands up to shock better.  Also, anyone use one of these babies on hard snow?  I just bought, and returned, a nice looking 1330SE that had the snowhog tires, but it jusy did not have the trAction to get it into hard snow like my old 826 (smooth tire, but with chains) does.

Gear case on what machine?  The Large Frame  and Pro series Simplicity's have the heavy duty cast iron gear case and some John Deer (Simplicity) also have it. 
aa335


Joined: Nov 29, 2008
Points: 2434

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #20   Dec 29, 2010 9:08 pm
Dr_Woof wrote:
Anyone know if the gearcase (in the auger housing) is made of cast iron, or aluminum?  Seems like all the cheaper models are using aliminum but the more expensive ones are cast iron that stands up to shock better.  Also, anyone use one of these babies on hard snow?  I just bought, and returned, a nice looking 1330SE that had the snowhog tires, but it jusy did not have the trAction to get it into hard snow like my old 826 (smooth tire, but with chains) does.

That's not true.  There are expensive models with cast aluminum gear cases.  I think aluminum gear cases are predominant in most of the current snowblowers.
Bill_H


Location: Maine
Joined: Jan 12, 2008
Points: 354

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #21   Dec 29, 2010 10:30 pm
aa335 wrote:
That's not true.  There are expensive models with cast aluminum gear cases.  I think aluminum gear cases are predominant in most of the current snowblowers.

We are seeing a lot more aluminum used than in the past. But we still see cast iron on the "heavier duty" machines. Aluminum is much cheaper and easier to manufacture a finished part with, but cast iron is much stronger and really has no downside except for the expense and weight. Weight is an advantage on the front of the machine so it comes down to cost.
And as we all (unfortunately) know, a great majority of today's machines are not built to last forever   they are built to maximize profits. I'm not saying profits are bad - we wouldn't have any companies making anything without them - but I am not a fan of maximizing profit by reducing quality.

Who the hell let all the morning people run things?
aa335


Joined: Nov 29, 2008
Points: 2434

Re: Look at the Yamaha Snowblower in Japan.
Reply #22   Dec 29, 2010 11:06 pm
Bill_H wrote:
We are seeing a lot more aluminum used than in the past. But we still see cast iron on the "heavier duty" machines. Aluminum is much cheaper and easier to manufacture a finished part with, but cast iron is much stronger and really has no downside except for the expense and weight. Weight is an advantage on the front of the machine so it comes down to cost.
And as we all (unfortunately) know, a great majority of today's machines are not built to last forever   they are built to maximize profits. I'm not saying profits are bad - we wouldn't have any companies making anything without them - but I am not a fan of maximizing profit by reducing quality.

What you are saying is true to an extend.  However, there's is the other side of the coin that I'll just throw in for consideration.

With the aid of computers, CAD systems, and Finite Element Analysis, many companies have utilize these tools to optimize the design for the specific duty and stress.  Gear cases can be made lighter and of different material that is suitable for homeowner use.  It's smarter use of material, reduce costs to manufacturer, reduce unnecessary use of materials and energy, and makes it more price competitive.  Sure as a layman, we may naturally want things heavy and thick as it can represent robustness and reliable.  I can tell you these costs reductions are not merely driven by profit, but to remain price competitive to survive.  The age of computer and global economy has made that practice a necessity.  Consumers drive down costs, squeezing profit margins from suppliers.  It's a vicious cycle. 

As a consumers, one must realize that these changes are our own doing too.  Make your purchases wisely, and think about how it does affect the future the next time you step into Walmart, Costco, Home Depot, and Sams Club.

Americans wants things cheap, high salaries and wages, with good benefits.  Ask yourself how is this expectation sustainable.  For every American citizen, there are 20 other people who will gladly produce what you want for a whole lot less pay than what we expect.
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