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ArtShapiro


Location: Lake Forest, CA
Joined: Dec 31, 2007
Points: 9

Dyson Thermal Sensor
Original Message   Mar 27, 2012 3:03 pm
Haven't posted here in ages, but enjoy checking out the forum.

I have a Dyson DC07 which gets most of the use in my home, as it's easier to setup and use than my favorite Rainbow. The DC07 has always had the legendary thermal sensor problem when used with the hose and tools - after three or four minutes it shuts off for several minutes until that sensor decides to reset. I've never had the problem using it as a vacuum in my mostly-tiled home, so I haven't worried about the issue.

This weekend, a friend with no vacuum but new carpets borrowed the DC07. I warned her about the problem when using the hose. She rather angrily called me and said it was cutting out every few minutes on her floors. After she calmed down, we decided that perhaps the issue was that it's more of a workload to turn the brush roller on carpeting, causing the overheating issue that I don't see on my own home with only one carpeted room. Is that a valid hypothesis?

I really should deal with the issue, as it's been a bit of an annoyance. So my question: is replacement of the thermal sensor something a reasonably mechanical person can handle, or is it best left to a professional? Can I even get the part in question? I gather from a little bit of web research that there's quite a bit of disassembly involved, but don't have a feel for its difficulty.

Second question: this lady just lost her job, and funds are limited. She'd like to purchase a vacuum, most likely on the used market. Any advice on what she might consider? About the only requirement is that there be a hose and tools so she can vacuum the furniture; guess that cuts out brands like Simplicity. I'm thinking that even Kenmore seems to get reasonably high respect and might be a reasonable choice.

Art
This message was modified Mar 27, 2012 by ArtShapiro
Replies: 1 - 5 of 5View as Outline
vacmanuk


Location: Scotland UK
Joined: May 31, 2009
Points: 1162

Re: Dyson Thermal Sensor
Reply #1   Mar 27, 2012 6:05 pm
Check out the Hoover Windtunnel Air. It seems to be a popular model on a forum I've just joined. I have the UK equivalent and here's its quite expensive but Walmart apparently were selling these at cheap prices. Quite a good, compact mini upright with eager power and lightweight.
ArtShapiro


Location: Lake Forest, CA
Joined: Dec 31, 2007
Points: 9

Re: Dyson Thermal Sensor
Reply #2   Mar 29, 2012 12:35 pm
Well, if anyone cares: I found an older Kenmore unit, obviously a rebranded Panasonic, on CraigsList (for non-US folks, a popular localized online classified ad site),  It's a model 116.22612201.  It had apparently been offered at $75, and when it didn't fetch any buyers the owner marked it down to $25.  We drove over, checked it out, (and played with the owner's 22 pound Norwegian Forest Cat that looked like a small sheep.)  It's in fine shape, remarkably well-maintained, and a steal at that price.  The Dyson murders it in air flow, but it felt in the same ballpark as my Rainbow so I'm sure it will work out fine.  I appreciate VacManUK's Hoover recommendation - this one just happened to pop up at a good time and attractive price.

Does anyone know the vintage of that model?  I'd guess around 1999-2000.

Still pondering what to do on my Dyson, if anything.  I see that thermal sensor available from a seller on the British eBay, but am just a little apprehensive about the amount of work required to replace it and of course have no assurance that this is the root cause of the problem.

Art
This message was modified Mar 29, 2012 by ArtShapiro
Trilobite


Joined: Nov 7, 2007
Points: 121

Re: Dyson Thermal Sensor
Reply #3   Apr 1, 2012 3:51 pm
First of all, are you ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE that the ducts, and filters are clear of dust and dirt? The DC07 has an inherent design fault: the dust deposited by the seven small cyclones clogs the central tube, eventually leading to a backlog of dirt steadily rising up the central tube, until the small cyclones are totally blocked. To see if the tube is blocked, empty the bin. With the trapdoor open, shine a torch up the tube. You should be able to see all the way up the tube to the trigger bellows. If not, the tube is clogged. I spent an afternoon last summer, disassembling a relative's DC07 cyclonic bin that was clogged to within a few inches of the top of the assembly. The dirt was packed solid; I had to use a garden cane to prod and force it out.
This message was modified Apr 1, 2012 by Trilobite
ArtShapiro


Location: Lake Forest, CA
Joined: Dec 31, 2007
Points: 9

Re: Dyson Thermal Sensor
Reply #4   Apr 1, 2012 6:59 pm
Trilobite wrote:
First of all, are you ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE that the ducts, and filters are clear of dust and dirt?


Well, if they were clogged, wouldn't I have the problem vacuuming my tile floors, not just with the tools?

Before posting, I did blow out the cyclone assembly as best I could with a leafblower and with the appropriate nozzle from my air compressor. I suppose I could swish it in the bathtub for a half hour, as it's too big by far for my ultrasonic cleaner, but the question in the first paragraph still stands.

Art
Trilobite


Joined: Nov 7, 2007
Points: 121

Re: Dyson Thermal Sensor
Reply #5   Apr 5, 2012 3:38 pm
ArtShapiro wrote:
Well, if they were clogged, wouldn't I have the problem vacuuming my tile floors, not just with the tools?

Before posting, I did blow out the cyclone assembly as best I could with a leafblower and with the appropriate nozzle from my air compressor. I suppose I could swish it in the bathtub for a half hour, as it's too big by far for my ultrasonic cleaner, but the question in the first paragraph still stands.

Art


It could be the case that only a few of the seven smaller cyclones are operating correctly. The air path from the floor is shorter than via the hose and tools. A tiled floor offers little airflow restriction, whereas carpet does. And no, DC07 should not suffer from thermal sensor failure. The motor must be faulty and should be replaced.
Replies: 1 - 5 of 5View as Outline
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