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iMacDaddy


Electrolux UltraOne EL7070, Bissell BigGreen Deep Cleaning Machine

Joined: Oct 30, 2007
Points: 110

Canister Filtration Tests
Original Message   Mar 11, 2011 12:05 am
Here are some rather interesting videos showcasing filtration testing of various canisters.
Samsung SC8796

Dyson DC22

Electrolux UltraOne

Miele S5
This message was modified Mar 11, 2011 by iMacDaddy
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CarmineD


Joined: Dec 31, 2007
Points: 5894

Re: Canister Filtration Tests
Reply #1   Mar 11, 2011 7:16 am
Excellent video not just for MIELE vacuums but to sell air purifiers if you own/use a few of these vacuums.

Carmine D.

mole


.

Location: earth
Joined: Sep 30, 2007
Points: 772

Re: Canister Filtration Tests
Reply #2   Apr 12, 2012 9:25 am
This will be my last post for a while.But here goes.

H.E.P.A  filtration.

It amazes me how easily the public is led astray by some TRUMPED UP  misapplied, irrelevent, marketing GIMMICK like hepa.

95% at 2.5 microns is more than sufficient for anyone with a normal immune system,unless ther is a plague.But in the more is better mentality

people fall for the ABSUDITY of bagless hepa filtration.The concept itself is ludicrous.

If these little particles are so dangerous that  we can not allow them back into the air why risk the them from escaping from a dust container or  filter bag???

Thanks treb.........

MOLE

vacmanuk


Location: Scotland UK
Joined: May 31, 2009
Points: 1162

Re: Canister Filtration Tests
Reply #3   Apr 13, 2012 11:09 am
It's not just the particles we can't see, that we've all been led that are dangerous. No one spares a thought for the smaller cleaning tools and internals that dust hangs off from - or do owners purposefully go about cleaning everything in sight once they use their vacuum on a daily or weekly basis. I don't think so!
Moderator Mike_W


"There is no BEST or PERFECT vacuum cleaner"

"Take care of your vacuum, then your vacuum will take care of you"


Joined: Dec 1, 2004
Points: 1683

Re: Canister Filtration Tests
Reply #4   Apr 13, 2012 1:28 pm
mole wrote:
This will be my last post for a while.But here goes.

H.E.P.A  filtration.

It amazes me how easily the public is led astray by some TRUMPED UP  misapplied, irrelevent, marketing GIMMICK like hepa.

95% at 2.5 microns is more than sufficient for anyone with a normal immune system,unless ther is a plague.But in the more is better mentality

people fall for the ABSUDITY of bagless hepa filtration.The concept itself is ludicrous.

If these little particles are so dangerous that  we can not allow them back into the air why risk the them from escaping from a dust container or  filter bag???

Thanks treb.........

MOLE


I am not sure why this thread is brought up after a whole year, then you say "This will be my last post for a while".  If I remember correctly, you have been on the side of "HEPA is a waste" while I have been on the side of "different amounts of filtration for different people".

When recommending a vacuum cleaner, I am not one who will push the highest filtration machine, because they may not need it.  Because, like you alluded to, I believe that move is not better.  It actually can be a waste.  I am a person who has some allergic reactions to things in the air or on surfaces.  Years ago, I switched to a Filter queen and found my allergic reactions ceased.  The Filter Queen does not have HEPA filtration, but does use a special material for their filter cones, which keep debris in the bucket and not back into the air.  This cellulose material also allows longer airflow before getting blocked off by particles like regular paper.  I also found that much less dust was redeposited back in the room and on furniture.  There are people who will have it worse than I do.  They will  need more filtration.

As for HEPA and bagless, well I have always debated w/the pro dyson club.  They have stressed from the beginning how the dyson is best for the worst sufferers.  Tom G. was one of those proponents of the dyson and how much better it was, because the dirt drops from the bottom and not from the top like a bagless from say a Dirt Devil.  It was said that this does not stir up the dust.  Wrong.  It does not matter.  Objects are going to fall at the same speed.  Then we heard that the container could be dumped in a bag, wrapped around the dirt container.  Dust/allergens are still going to escape and be a problem.

There is a need for filtration, but we all will not need the same level.  We need to step back and figure out how much of a problem we have.  People have seen hoq I can recommend a Miele, but tell them they would do fine w/the regular filter and not have to pay a small fortune for the TOL filter.  What we do not need to say is there is no need for HEPA filtration.
This message was modified Apr 13, 2012 by Mike_W
vacmanuk


Location: Scotland UK
Joined: May 31, 2009
Points: 1162

Re: Canister Filtration Tests
Reply #5   Apr 14, 2012 2:49 pm
Mike_W wrote:
I am not sure why this thread is brought up after a whole year, then you say "This will be my last post for a while".  If I remember correctly, you have been on the side of "HEPA is a waste" while I have been on the side of "different amounts of filtration for different people".

There is a need for filtration, but we all will not need the same level.  We need to step back and figure out how much of a problem we have.  People have seen hoq I can recommend a Miele, but tell them they would do fine w/the regular filter and not have to pay a small fortune for the TOL filter.  What we do not need to say is there is no need for HEPA filtration.

The problem is Mike, there are more additives and pollutants in the air than ever before and the brands we all love and loathe are cost cutting at every corner to make a fast buck rather than properly engineer the machines - the Miele S2 for example doesn't have a seal around its dust bag after you lift the door - and only on higher priced models do you get the "sealed" principle. You yourself may not need a HEPA filter in a vacuum - because up and until now, as consumers we are led to believe that the HEPA idea cleans the air cleaner than the air that goes into the machine. Since last year's Tsunami and volcano eruptions, Scotland & parts of the UK are being littered with volcanic ash and sand from Egypt being blown in. I see it mostly on my outside refuse bin, garden chairs and my car and I know my carpets get the sand as I've seen and felt it from the dirt produced in my Bissell upright carpet washer. Some people I know get eye infections because of the excess sand in the air and doctors/hospitals just recommend cleaning the home more often than not and vacuuming is the first key point in combat.

Although we don't necessarily need HEPA filters, their design in some machines are worthy of using, not just for keeping back odour. Certainly in a Miele canister in a home that does clean after pets, the dank odour from the third from the fourth dust bag out of the standard Miele box of 4, being used can usually be smelt when a Super Air Clean filter is fitted compared to the neutral smell that the AAC or HEPA filter keeps back. In terms of sand, well it comes in through the windows, onto the curtains, along the windows, into the carpet (where most of the damage will occur if its constantly ground in) but is odour-less. In this respect the AAC or HEPA filters keep back the sand from re-entering, unless you have a bag-less system that defeats the purpose and you empty the dust in your kitchen bin without much sealage when it hits the bin and dust flies back up and out. I don't see why I have to compromise on filtration in a vacuum cleaner  if I want fresh air and can't open a window for fear of the wind blowing in sand. I don't see why I have to kit my machine with a more expensive filter - but if it does the job of holding back the majority of sand and dust in the air, I'll fit it.

It's not just an issue where we need to step back and figure how much of a problem we have - it really comes down to what you really need from a vacuum cleaner and what it will be put through in your home in terms of cleaning. Buyers after all have that option to consider between canister, cordless, mains power, upright or something in between. Filter options should therefore be an option too, instead of having to pay an extra price to have that filter alone when it would be cheaper to just buy the filter as a separate purchase.
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